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Of course, even if you feel like you could use a boost in the size department, there’s a good chance your penis is actually average. The average erect penis length for most men ranges between 5-6.5 inches, while the average flaccid length ranges between 1-4 inches [2]. Although studies haven’t found a relationship between penis size and race, the evidence does show that normal stretched penile length varies between ethnic groups, with East Asians having a slightly shorter stretched penile length compared to African-American and Caucasian ethnic groups [3].
Richard, a mechanic from upstate New York, is a muscular, athletic guy. He has a loving wife who has always enjoyed their sex life. But ever since he was a young boy, Richard couldn't get over the feeling that his penis was too small. In public bathrooms, he'd use the handicapped stall. He felt embarrassed in gym locker rooms and when standing naked before his wife. "I didn't feel manly enough," he tells WebMD.

Two urological researchers, Marco Ordera and Paolo Gontero of the University of Turin in Italy, examined outcomes from both surgical and nonsurgical procedures for “male enhancement” in previous studies. Half of the studies involved surgical procedures performed on 121 men; the other half involved nonsurgical enhancement techniques used by 109 men.

Stretching exercises not only make your penis longer in erect state but the length of flaccid penis will also increase. Stretching exercises are completely safe if you do warm exercise before them and use common sense. For stretching exercises you don’t need to apply lubricant on your penis. If you gain erection while performing these exercises you have to stop and let erection subside, then continue with exercise.
That’s why today I would like to introduce you to penis stretching techniques before you ever come across pills or contemplate surgery. To help you learn about this form of penis enlargement, I’ve sectioned multiple questions that will help you completely grasp the fundamentals of penis stretching and how you can build off of them in order to significantly increase your size.
6 weeks passes and I still can’t achieve a full erection. My maximum was 70% and I was having weird symptoms with my member. I had developed a torsion of maybe 10 degrees, as in the head was rotated. Nothing too grotesque as I’ve seen other guys born with this naturally, but it just wasn’t straight anymore. The other symptom led to seaches online pointing to something called ‘hard flaccid,’ something not medically recognized as a real symptom. My penis would not go soft basically. It felt rubbery and stiff all the time, and it only relaxed to what I was used to if I was urinating or laying down on my back. It’s resistant to being moved and prevents me from getting an erection while standing up.
If there is one unifying factor, it is a lack of confidence about what nature has provided. The average length of a British penis is, according to a 2016 King’s College London study, 5.16in erect and 3.67in flaccid. Only 0.14% of men have what one University of California study defined as a “micropenis” – that is, less than 2.5 inches when erect. Nonetheless, study after study shows dissatisfaction remains widespread among men.
As the name implies, the traction method involves the phallus being placed in an extender and then stretched daily. One team of researchers quoted in the study reported average growth of 0.7 inches (flaccid) in participants who used the method for four to six hours each day over four months. Another team reported an average increase of nearly an inch (0.9 inches, flaccid) plus some slight improvement in girth after similar treatments lasting a course of six months.
The side effects of lengthening surgeries are numerous and include infections, nerve damage, reduced sensitivity, and difficulty getting an erection. Perhaps most disturbing, scarring can leave you with a penis that's shorter than what you started with. Widening the penis is even more controversial. Side effects can be unsightly -- a lumpy, bumpy, uneven penis.
The vacuum pump. This is a cylinder that sucks out air. You stick your penis in and the resulting vacuum draws extra blood into it, making it erect and a little bigger. You then clamp off the penis with a tight ring -- like a tourniquet -- to keep the blood from leaking back into your body. What are the drawbacks? The effect only lasts as long as you have the ring on. Using it for more than 20 to 30 minutes can cause tissue damage. This is sometimes used as a treatment for erectile dysfunction, but has not been proven to actually increase the size of the penis.
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