Herbal remedies, Kegels (pelvic floor exercises — learn more here), and exercises have all been mentioned as potential ways to make your penis bigger. However, we’ve searched and searched for medical evidence that these techniques will work to grow your penis, but there’s simply zero, zilch, nada, no evidence. You may find lots of unverified anecdotes, which come from a sample size of one, but they simply cannot be trusted. After all, no one on the internet knows you’re a dog (or liar). We recommend that you avoid these techniques.

And if you're worrying about your size pleasing your partner, remember that penetration is just one part of sex, and everyone's preferences are different. Many women don't even orgasm from penile-vaginal sex, for instance, and other people don't care very much about size or length. The size of your penis could possibly be unrelated entirely to your partner's ability to experience pleasure.
Most of these products that are available over the counter feature herbal and natural ingredients. They are considered safe for use [12], but you should contact your physician if you are taking medications, are under 18, or have any chronic conditions. Even some natural ingredients can interfere with prescription medications [13]. A small minority of people, including males, can also have reactions to products such as enhancements, even though they are natural. As with any other supplement or food you consume, use your due diligence to make sure there are no ingredients you are allergic to in the products you choose to take.

Penile size differs between men of different ethnic backgrounds and large studies of penis girth and length have been conducted by condom manufacturers. What many men perceive as a short penis actually falls into normal range size. Based on many published charts, scientific articles, and self reported web based surveys, 95 % of Caucasian men will fall into one of the following categories of size:
Clark was so inspired that he invented a penis weight-hanging device called the Malehanger, which attaches up to 80 pounds of weight to a flaccid dick for 20 minutes at a time. (It’s best to restore circulation after 15 to 20 minutes, he says.) Clark typically advises customers to use Malehanger instead of jelqing and stretching, since he claims the more focused you are on one type of training, the better results you’ll get.
Pills to treat erectile dysfunction can be prescribed to you on the NHS or by private health practices, online or in person, safely and legally. These generally work by relaxing the muscles of the penis and temporarily increasing blood flow to help you get and keep an erection in order to have penetrative sex. These pills will only treat the physical symptoms of your erectile dysfunction, and do not treat the underlying cause (which can be physical or psychological).

So in 1997 he pivoted to the penis full-time, flexing his male enhancement chops by answering questions in web forums, Usenet groups and AOL chat rooms. Whatever he didn’t know, he learned, combing medical journals and consulting urologists to base his methodology on sound research. He was frustrated, though, by a dearth of information on natural, exercise-based male enhancement training and says the majority of online communities at the turn of the millenium were only focused on pumping. (Both jelqing and penis pumping force blood to the penis but do so differently. Imagine a tube of toothpaste: Starting at the bottom and squeezing the toothpaste out is jelqing; sucking the toothpaste out is pumping.)
There are several surgical treatments, most of which carry a risk of significant complications.[6] Procedures by unlicensed surgeons can lead to serious complications.[7] Risky surgical treatments include subcutaneous fat injection, division of the suspensory ligament, and the injection of dermal fillers, silicone gel, or PMMA.[8][9] The American Urological Association (AUA) and the Urology Care Foundation "consider subcutaneous fat injection for increasing penile girth to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious. The AUA also considers the division of the suspensory ligament of the penis for increasing penile length in adults to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious."[10] Dermal fillers are also not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the penis.[11]
Studies suggest that when erect, the average adult penis measures around 13cm in length and 10cm to 12cm in circumference. It might be comforting to know that a penis that is smaller when flaccid may be a similar length to that of a larger flaccid penis when both are erect. But measuring your penis isn’t going to change its size, so ask yourself, why measure it? Do you think that discovering that your penis is within the ‘average range’ will soothe your anxieties about it being small? What will you do if you discover it is in fact, smaller than average? Unfortunately, many men try to increase their penis size through various interventions that can be invasive, costly and not make a difference to the way they feel about themselves. The solution is more likely to be a change of attitude towards yourself and your penis, namely learning to love what you’ve got.
While many men worry their penis is too small, research shows that most men's penises are normal and they needn't be concerned. Professor Kevan Wylie, a sexual medicine consultant, says men with concerns about their penis size should consider talking to a health professional before experimenting with treatments, which are mostly ineffective, expensive and potentially harmful.
The vacuum pump. This is a cylinder that sucks out air. You stick your penis in and the resulting vacuum draws extra blood into it, making it erect and a little bigger. You then clamp off the penis with a tight ring -- like a tourniquet -- to keep the blood from leaking back into your body. What are the drawbacks? The effect only lasts as long as you have the ring on. Using it for more than 20 to 30 minutes can cause tissue damage. This is sometimes used as a treatment for erectile dysfunction, but has not been proven to actually increase the size of the penis.
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